Windows Live Mail – Sending Problem Resolved

After 3 hours of messing around, Windows Live Mail – Outgoing mail was finally sorted, the mail account – info@chatteris.biz –  is with Go Daddy and was successfully set up a few days age, shortly after setting it up a ‘Congratulations your online’ mail came.

I configured the POP3 settings after setting a new account and I could receive mail just fine, unfortunately I kept getting a failure to send, with the following message:

smptout.europe.secureserver.net error 530 authentication required.

I checked my username and password (more than once!), tried changing from port 25, to 3535 and other flavors’, all to no avail.

It turns out that in the Go Daddy e-mail mangers panel, SMTP Relays should show 250, mine showed originally 0.

The resolution was to delete the account, and recreate the exact same one back again, and miraculously, the SMTP field had 250 in it, and everything worked, I could send mails again 🙂

smtpI did try and edit the existing account to manually trigger the SMTP to 250 from ), but this generated an ‘Invalid ‘error, so was not an option.

To stop Windows Live giving outgoing error messages based on the unsent mails, from the ‘Home’ tab, scroll down to ‘Outbox’ and delete unsent mails.

 

Chatteris Weather PC Mods

Took advantage of the break ant tweaked the Chatteris Weather PC, the original Weather Display software is version 10.37R Build 81, I finally decided to upload the Beta version 10.37R Build 255, at the same time I tided the file structure.  If you were monitoring the site today you would have noticed intermittent outages as certain elements stopped working, or were only partially right, for example, automated Tweets on the 1/2 hour were sent without any weather data attached, only the webcam image.

I changed the Cookie- Consent provider as well today, the new type will cause a pop-up box at the bottom left of the screen, you can either accept that Chatteris Weather uses cookies by clicking on the green tab and the box will disappear for 30 days.  If your not sure, clicking ‘Read More’ will take you to the Privacy Policy page.

In order to save a little bit of upload bandwidth, I’ve throttled back some of the data frequency, this will not be noticeable, but it’s a back office function which need doing.

Due to a number of problems which is to be expected on a Beta version of software, I have reverted back to the original version and build, I will keep downloading and testing as everything is now configured, so hopefully downtime will be at an absolute minimum.

 

 

Privacy Policy V0.3

This privacy policy sets out how Chatteris Weather uses and protects any information that you give Chatteris Weather when you use this website. Chatteris Weather is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement. Chatteris Weather may amend this policy from time to time by updating this page, notification of any version updates will be via Chatteris Weather blog pages. You should check this page regularly to ensure that you are happy with any version changes since you last acceptance. Here is how we handle information about your visit to our Web site:

Information Collected and Stored Automatically

If you do nothing during your visit but browse through the website or read pages, we will gather and store certain information about your visit automatically. This information does not identify you personally. We automatically collect and store information during your visit such as the following:

  • Your IP address (an IP address is a number that is automatically assigned to your computer whenever you are surfing the Web) from which you access our web site
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We use this information to improve our website by analysing web traffic to learn about visitors to our site and their demographics.

Information That You Voluntarily Provide

We do not collect personally-identifiable information unless you choose to provide it to us. If you provide us with personally identifiable information, for example by sending an e-mail, filling out a form and submitting it through our website or using the Guest-book, we use that information only to respond to your message and to help us provide you with the information and services that you request, for example automated weather condition and lightning alerts.

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Cookies and other Tracking Technologies

A cookie is a small file which asks permission to be placed on your computers hard drive. Your computers internet settings determines if the file is added, if you have the setting to accept cookies, this enables us to analyse web traffic or lets you know when you visit a particular site. We use traffic log cookies to identify which pages are being used and so tailor the website to meet the visitors needs. We only use this information for statistical analysis purposes. Overall, cookies help us provide you with a better website, by enabling us to monitor which pages you find useful and which you do not. A cookie in no way gives us access to your computer or any information about you, other than the data you choose to share with us. You can choose to accept or decline cookies. Most web browsers automatically accept cookies, but you can usually modify your browser setting to decline cookies if you prefer. This may prevent you from taking full advantage of the website.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us at Chatteris Weather.

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Mag Loop – Part 4 – Initial Values

Did a rough make up of the Mag Loops coupling loop, used RG213 to start with, then tried 7mm copper pipe, both reading were very similar, I still have some tweaking with some other options yet before I decide on which to use on the completed set up.

The VSWR reading have been very encouraging, with the capacitor closed (meshed) it tunes from 2.884MHz to 21.292MHz with the capacitor fully open (unmeshed).

mag loop v1 22 March 15

The sample points were taken at the bands PSK frequency (apart from the first and last) and shows that it will tune from 15m to 80m.

Mag Loop Part 3 – Capacitor motor drive

Thought I’d give an update on the mag loop project, I’ve been busy making the capacitor support, as it is important to reduce resistive losses, I mounted the capacitor using 1.7mm thick sheet copper, the main mounting is one side of the capacitor and I have brought the connection off using 28mm copper pipe, this goes to a compression fitting in which I have also soldered the olive the reduce where possible electrical resistance.

The reason for using 28mm pipe is that I can use pipe reducers when I come to play with different pipe thicknesses and configurations.

The top of the capacitor is the second terminal, I bought a small piece of 54mm copper pipe, after putting a small slot in the side, this slides neatly over the end of the capacitor and is secured in place with a jubilee clip, a 28mm copper stub pipe was soldered onto the 54mm piece completing the loop terminations.

The capacitor assembly is mounted on a cut down plastic bread board, the shaft from the capacitor has a flexible 12mm to 6mm coupling reducer, the linkage to the stepper motor is with 6mm diameter nylon threaded rod, this allows for conversion of rotary movement to linear movement is I decide on using limit switches or positional potentiometers at a later date.

The stepper motor is a Bipolar NEMA 17 200 step, 12v @ 350Ma, the 5mm motor shaft has a flexible coupling affixed, this not only compensates for any out-off alignment but also allows the 6mm threaded rod to connect to the 5mm shaft. Nylon was chosen for the motor linkage as this insulates is from the high voltages which develop across the capacitor when in use and the motor, the capacitor is rated ay 4Kv and I will have to throttle back output power to ensure this is not exceeded.

I opted for a stepper motor over a DC motor after reading that the brush noise could be a problem, it is easy to convert from stepper to DC should I need to in the future, it is also easier and cheaper to control a DC motor, so I did consider this option before committing to the stepper motor.

I’m using an Arduino Uno clone (www.sintron-hk.com) with an 5v rotary encoder, the Arduino is connected to a A4988 Stepper Motor Driver Carrier with Voltage Regulators.

The A4988 can be supplied with an input voltage of up to 35v and it has on board 5v and 3.3v regulators, this reduces the need for external components or the need for a separate power supply for the motor and logic circuits, I use the A4988 5v output to power the Arduino when in use making for a neat solution.

20150315_184832[1]

This is the unit on the desk allowing me to play and tweak.

Link to YouTube video showing the control of motor.

Although not shown in the youtube video, the A4988 allows microstepping, rather than simply moving the motor in 1.8 degree steps which would be to course to control the capacitors movement accurately enough to optimize tuning, this feature will give excellent adjustable control.

The control unit which will be in Part 4, will have the rotary encoder for controlling motor rotation and direction and a multi position rotary switch, the switch positions will be ON >> Half Speed >> Quarter Speed >> Eighth Speed >> Sixteenth Speed.

The biggest obstacle in getting this working was my zero understanding of the programming language used for the Arduino, I spent considerable time looking for a suitable program I could download, these are referred to a Sketch’s, and finally I found it here and I can’t thank them enough for making it avaialable.

As the Arduino is open source, their are stacks of forums and areas for help, eventually I will play with the Arduino as it is yet another facet of the hobby.

Bill of Materials to motorize:

Ebay Vendors –
54mm copper pipe £2.40
6mm Threaded Nylon rod £1.52
Flexible shaft couplings £4.28
Rotary encoder £0.99
Sinton Arduino full kit £30.95 (replacement Arduino board as the kit one is in use £4.50)
Copper sheet £7.50

B&Q –
28mm Couplings £4.50 each

Hobby Tronics –
A4988 and heatsinks £7.78

Adafruit –
NEMA 17 stepper motor $14.00

Mag Loop – Part 2

Well got the 28mm pipe from Plumbase Ely (01354 663711), excellent service and very reasonable delivery charge, spent £2.99 at Argos for children’s play sand, filled the pipe and sealed the ends with insulating tape.

The Bending Rig (link) worked ok, the grooves were designed for 37mm pipe so the 28mm flared slightly due to the high walls, also as the spacing of the rollers was quite wide, the bend started at a fixed point set back from the end of the pipe which means the circle can’t be fully formed this might make connecting difficult if I decide on a dual loop configuration.

The pipe has a number of compression creases which is a shame, the crease at the bottom of the bend was due to me thinking that I could close the last few inches by pulling the loop together – WRONG!!, but as this was the very first one I’ve ever done, it turned out ok, I do have a spare length of 28mm, so next time I will try not to rush the bending process and I might even try and heat and anneal the pipe so as to make even more malleable.

SAM_5300 (Medium) Loop held by my very able other half.

Mag Loop Bender Rig

Made the pipe bender for the magnetic loop today, the idea is that by slowly bringing the pinch roller closer to the static rollers after each pass of the copper pipe, a bend will be introduced, repeating this with slightly more pressure will ultimately form a loop.

I thought how best to engineer the screw mechanism to apply pressure to the pinch roller against the static rollers and decided it was time to dust off my old trusty Workmate bench.

SAM_5296 (Medium)

The wood grooved rollers were made locally after I put a shout out on ‘Streetlife’ a local community website, these were made to accommodate 37mm pipe as that will be the maximum I will ever be able to afford!

In order to make the rollers, freely rotate I fitted bearings with a 10mm shaft size (10off 25mm x 8mm shielded bearings for £5.12 Ebay).

SAM_5292 (Medium)

I drilled three 10mm holes through the Workmate top (I did look at using the existing holes on the Workmate top and sleeving them, but their was no benefit over drilling relatively small holes), using 10mm threaded rod I passed this through the worktop (2off 10mm x 500mm £3.00 Wicks).

SAM_5293 (Medium)

Made up a cheap and cheerful handle (Flat bar 1m x 25mm x 5mm £7.12 Wicks) for the pinch roller and bolted this through the worktop using 10mm threaded rod.

SAM_5294 (Medium)

SAM_5295 (Medium)

The next step is to get some lengths of 28mm copper pipe and see if it works, I’ll be using sand inside the pipe in the hope of avoiding any creasing,(fingers crossed).

Link to my first result of bending 28mm pipe.

Replacement Anti-Virus Installed

I originally used Norton Anti-Virus across 5 PC’s in the house but the annual renewal costs were getting a bit silly, especially as I want to buy radio stuff so savings have to be made!

The family bank with Barclays and they offer each account holder FREE Kaspersky Anti-Virus software with two PC licences, I have downloaded the program and linked the accounts to a centralized web based dashboard and everything is working just fine, as I have three PCs including the weather PC, it costs an additional £9.95 for 5 PC licensing which is a great offer in my view, (I did try the free AVG Anti-Virus program but was plagued with ‘buy now’ and ‘upgrade’ messages).

Kaspersky Total Security is free if you bank with Barclays, the link is at the bottom of your online banking page.

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